From KEMs to protocols

This is the third part of my series on Key Encapsulation Mechanisms (KEMs) and why you should care about them. Part 1 looked at what a KEM is and the KEM/DEM paradigm for constructing public key encryption schemes. Part 2 looked at cases where the basic KEM abstraction is not sufficient and showed how it can be extended to add support for multiple recipients and sender authentication. At the end of part 2, I promised to write a follow-up about tackling forward-secrecy and replay attacks in the KEM/DEM paradigm, so here it is. In this article we’ll go from simple one-way message encryption to a toy version of the Signal Protocol that provides forward secrecy and strong authentication of two (or more) parties.

WARNING: please pay attention to the word “toy” in the previous sentence. This is a blog post, not a thorough treatment of how to write a real end-to-end encrypted messaging protocol.

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How do you use a bearer URL?

In “Towards a standard for bearer token URLs”, I described a URL scheme that can be safely used to incorporate a bearer token (such as an OAuth access token) into a URL. That blog post concentrated on the technical details of how that would work and the security properties of the scheme. But as Tim Dierks commented on Twitter, it’s not necessarily obvious to people how you’d actually use this in practice. Who creates these URLs? How are they used and shared? In this follow-up post I’ll attempt to answer that question with a few examples of how bearer URLs could be used in practice.

The bearer URL scheme
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Towards a standard for bearer token URLs

In XSS doesn’t have to be Game Over, and earlier when discussing Can you ever (safely) include credentials in a URL?, I raised the possibility of standardising a new URL scheme that safely allows encoding a bearer token into a URL. This makes it more convenient to use lots of very fine-grained tokens rather than one token/cookie that grants access to everything, which improves security. It also makes it much easier to securely share access to individual resources, improving usability. In this post I’ll outline what such a new URL scheme would look like and the security advantages it provides over existing web authentication mechanisms. As browser vendors restrict the use of cookies, I believe there is a need for a secure replacement, and that bearer URLs are a good candidate.

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When a KEM is not enough

In my previous post, I described the KEM/DEM paradigm for hybrid encryption. The key encapsulation mechanism is given the recipient’s public key and outputs a fresh AES key and an encapsulation of that key that the recipient can decapsulate to recover the AES key. In this post I want to talk about several ways that the KEM interface falls short and what to do about it:

  • As I’ve discussed before, the standard definition of public key encryption lacks any authentication of the sender, and the KEM-DEM paradigm is no exception. You often want to have some idea of where a message came from before you process it, so how can we add sender authentication?
  • If you want to send the same message to multiple recipients, a natural approach would be to encrypt the message once with a fresh AES key and then encrypt the AES key for each recipient. With the KEM approach though we’ll end up with a separate AES key for each recipient. How can we send the same message to multiple recipients without encrypting the whole thing separately for each one?
  • Finally, the definition of public key encryption used in the KEM/DEM paradigm doesn’t provide forward secrecy. If an attacker ever compromises the recipient’s long-term private key, they can decrypt every message ever sent to that recipient. Can we prevent this?

In this article I’ll tackle the first two issues and show how the KEM/DEM abstractions can be adjusted to cope with each. In a follow-up post I’ll then show how to tackle forward secrecy, along with replay attacks and other issues. Warning: this post is longer and has more technical details than the previous post. It’s really meant for people who already have some experience with cryptographic algorithms.

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Hybrid encryption and the KEM/DEM paradigm

If you know a bit about public key cryptography, you probably know that you don’t directly encrypt a message with a public key encryption algorithm like RSA. This is for many reasons, one of which being that it is incredibly slow. Instead you do what’s called hybrid encryption: first you generate a random AES key (*) and encrypt the message with that (using a suitable authenticated encryption mode), then you encrypt the AES key with the RSA public key. The recipient uses their RSA private key to decrypt the AES key and then uses that to decrypt the rest of the message. This is much faster than trying to encrypt a large message directly with RSA, so pretty much all sane implementations of RSA encryption do this.

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Making things

I made my daughter a toy tree house thing for Christmas out of old firewood (and a slice of cedar donated by a neighbour). It’s a bit clunky in places — “rustic” shall we say? But I probably enjoyed making this, over a few weeks of lunchtimes and evenings, more than anything I’ve done for a long time.

Figuring out a little pulley wheel
Glue-up
Coming together…
Ready to go on Christmas Eve.

I don’t think I’ll give up the day job just yet, and I think I’ll replace the top platforms at some point (the wood is not in good condition, made more obvious by the oil finish). But it’s been a huge hit – so far it’s been played with every day. I can’t ask more than that.

XSS doesn’t have to be game over

A message I’m very used to seeing – but does XSS have to mean game over for web security?

There’s a persistent belief among web security people that cross-site scripting (XSS) is a “game over” event for defence: there is no effective way to recover if an attacker can inject code into your site. Brian Campbell refers to this as “XSS Nihilism”, which is a great description. But is this bleak assessment actually true? For the most part yes, but in this post I want to talk about a faint glimmer on the horizon that might just be a ray of sunshine after all.

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Parse, don’t type-check

There’s a fantastic article from last year titled Parse, don’t validate. I’d highly recommend it to any programmer (along with the more recent follow up Names are not type safety). The basic idea is that there are two ways to check that some input to a function is valid:

  • A validator checks that the input is valid and throws an error if not. It doesn’t return anything. For example, checking that a list is not empty.
  • A parser does the same as a validator, but returns a more specific representation of the input that ensures that the required property is satisfied. For example, checking that a list is not empty and returning a NonEmptyList type.

The thesis of the article is that parsers are preferable to validators. If you’ve not read the original article, please do so – it’s very well written and makes the case much better than I can summarise it. The essential message is to make illegal states unrepresentable. In the article, this is done by making use of the type system. This is a philosophy I entirely agree with, but I want to point out and expand upon one ironic aspect of the argument:

A type checker is a paradigmatic example of a validator!

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API Security in Action is published!

I wasn’t expecting it so quickly, so it caught me a little off guard, but API Security in Action is now finally published. PDF copies are available now, with printed copies shipping by the end of the month. Kindle/ePub take a little bit longer but should be out in a few weeks time.

My own print copies will take a few weeks to ship to the UK, and I can’t wait to finally hold it in my hands. That’s a brighter ending to 2020.

At some point I’ll try and collect some thoughts about the process of writing it and my feelings with the finished product. But tonight I’ll settle for a glass (or two) of a nice red. Cheers!

Some incomplete thoughts about Gödel

I saw another article on Gödel’s incompleteness theorems linked from Reddit today. It’s a topic I’ve wanted to write about for some time. Although many articles do a decent job in giving an idea of what the big deal is (and this one is pretty good), they can sometimes give a misleading impression of what the theorems actually imply. I’m by no means an expert, but hopefully these notes are useful.

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